"LFO" Plays On A Strange Frequency Review

LFO is a very strange, very Swedish and very enjoyable little movie. It chronicles the misadventures of Robert Nord (Patrik Karlson, strangely lovable in his patheticness), an amateur scientist suffering from tinnitus who is currently out of work on disability. The lack of full time employment--not to mention the recent tragic deaths of his wife and son in a car accident--means that Robert is free to spend all day alone in his basement laboratory, conducting experiments to find the perfect frequency of sound--one that can offer Robert relief from the ringing in his ears. However, what he ends up discovering is even more powerful: a combination of frequencies that allows him to hypnotize people.

Dec
10
2014
Read more

"Iceman" Cometh, But You'll Wish It Hadn't Review

There is a strange, unimpeachable power to the ‘fish-out-of-water’ comedy that’s compelled many a disinterested filmgoer or uninspired screenwriter, especially when time travel’s involved. The conflict is simple, and the opportunity for play within a well-established structure is certainly ample, so it’s kind of amazing to watch Iceman totally screw it up. Whatever expectations you might have, this story of warriors unfrozen from the 16th Century will almost certainly fail to meet them. Lackluster as an actioner and grating as a comedy, Iceman manages to take one of the most basic formulas in pop film-making and rob it of entertainment value.

Dec
10
2014
Read more

"Leonardo" Would Approve Review

Inside the Mind of Leonardo is a feature-length documentary, shot in crisp high-definition 3D, that delves into Da Vinci’s private journals and places his words into the mouth of celebrated actor Peter Capaldi. It originally aired on television in the UK and Canada in 2013; now, as 2014 comes to a close, the film is being released in theaters across the globe. One can’t help but wonder if this is an effort to capitalize on the new-found popularity Capaldi has deservedly accrued since he was cast as the titular Time Lord on Doctor Who (before, in the US, he was more of a cult taste for those who admired the way he elevated the most vulgar curse words to high art on The Thick of It). Yet there are far worse ways to use his star power than to tell the story of the self-described “disciple of experience” whose name could and should be listed in the dictionary as the definition of Renaissance man.

Dec
10
2014
Read more

"Tammy" Takes Us on a Dead-End Roadtrip Review

After becoming the break-out star of Bridesmaids with her puppy hoarding and sink stools, Melissa McCarthy likely had her pick of comedy projects to choose from in the years that followed. Based on the 50/50 track record of those choices, however, it’s unclear whether she squandered or took full advantage of the boost Bridesmaids offered. For every decent follow-up flick (The Heat and St. Vincent), we get a dud like Identity Thief or Tammy, and the shortcomings of the failures tend to outweigh the highlights of the successes. Case in point: Tammy, the roadtrip comedy co-written by Melissa McCarthy and her husband Ben Falcone (who also directed), which fails to generate laughs at every stop and which seems to be nothing more than a bunch of poorly executed and written jokes strung together by a very loose premise.

Dec
10
2014
Read more

The Gambler Remake Slated for December Release

gambler_banner

James Toback’s The Gambler has been remade by film director Rupert Wyatt this year and will hit the cinemas globally on December 19. The film, which will star Mark Wahlberg as Jim Bennett a failing English professor who is struggling to hold down a respectable job while engaging frequently in high stakes gambling is joined by the enigmatic John Goodman in what promises to be a great end to a year of amazing movies.

Dec
10
2014
Read more

"Le Chef" Serves Paris Right Review

No, not the one with Jon Favreau and the food truck. Sadly, still not the one with Scarlett Johansson and Sofia Vergara. Instead, France’s Le Chef hinges on the always appealing talent of The Professional himself, Jean Reno. Falling into the strangely popular food-porn genre that is all the rage at the moment – think Helen Mirren in The Hundred-Foot Journey or, yes, even RatatouilleLe Chef delivers on the promise of a culture and a cuisine. Paris is exhibited in all its romantic glory and the food is done up in its seductive best, beautifully lit and tantalizingly displayed. Like all such movies, the film is enough to get any foodie ravenous and has endearing, if simple, performances, from the cast.

Dec
03
2014
Read more

"Kundo" Hits The Bullseye Review

Neither Kevin Costner or Cary Elwes make an appearance in this Robin Hood story. From American distributor Well Go USA Entertainment, comes this South Korean import of a hierarchical time of tyranny and the warriors who rose against the wealthy to empower the lower classes. In his fourth outing, director Yoon Jong-bin confidently follows in the footsteps of recent Asian epics, a la Zhang Yimou’s Hero and House of Flying Daggers. With more aesthetic grandeur and matured filmmaking, these imports with their lush visuals and nuanced emotionality make Hollywood’s found footage and handheld films look like juvenile student films. The sensibility is undeniably different, and most people might still want Costner or Crowe to play the Prince of Thieves, but Kundo delivers on an exciting, vibrant ride.

Dec
03
2014
Read more

Dim Lighting Makes It Tough To Get A Look At "The Thing On The Doorstep" Review

She's a fanatical devotee of the black arts.

In The Thing on the Doorstep (2014), Daniel Upton (David Bunce) is an artist with an annoying friend, Edward Derby (Rob Dalton). Though Upton introduces himself as Derby's reluctant friend, he is rather attached to him, lending money, chauffeuring him around at times, and being generally devastated as he is driven mad by his new wife Asenath Waite (Mary Jane Hansen). Upton's wife Marion (Susan Cicarelli-Caputo), a psychologist--right?--makes firm but vague mental diagnoses of both Asenath and Edward and is, incidentally (and irrelevantly) pregnant. Something strange is going on here and I'm not just talking about the lighting. Is it Cthulhu? No really, is it?

Dec
02
2014
Read more

"Covert Operation" Will Stay Classified In The 99 Cent Bin Review

Covert Operation, a.k.a. The Borderland, is one of those valiant attempts to launch a film career for a legitimate martial artist. Sedina Balde, former World and European karate champion, stars as a bounty hunter granted his freedom on the condition that he can rescue prisoners from a North Korean military compound. The film is by turns action and comedy, but Sedina is no Van Damme. While both share a heavy accent that impairs their English-language performances, the latter had a certain inexplicable on-screen quality that catapulted him to superstar status. Sedina is in a decidedly different group, more closely comparable to the likes of WWE’s deluge of screen stinkers.

Dec
02
2014
Read more

"CrazySexyCool" Doesn't Go Chasing Waterfalls Review

Remember buying TLC’s second album? If you do, you’re most likely that particular group of millennial that doesn’t in any way want the millennial title. That’s right; kids who actually grew up in the ‘90s and didn’t get cell phones until college. In 1994, TLC released the album CrazySexyCool, becoming the first all-girls group to have their work go Diamond. Almost twenty years later, VH1 released the biopic of the same name, charting the rise to power of one of the world’s most successful R&B/hip-hop trios.

Dec
02
2014
Read more