Kyle North

Staff Writer



"Transformers Prime" Still Lays The Smack Down Review

The final season of the Emmy-winning and fan-adored Transformers Prime animated show takes on the subtitle of Beast Hunters, but not to fret; the emphasis is still on good ol’ fashioned Autobot vs. Decepticon smack downs for the fate of Earth.

Following Season 2, which saw a frenzied Indiana Jones/Nazi Occult-style hunt for artifacts to tip the scales of the war on both sides, Season 3 finds the Autobot base destroyed and the Autobots scattered to the wind. Megatron captures Ratchet and pushes him to complete a formula with Shockwave that could possibility restore Cybertron, as the Predaking discovers who’s really behind the Predacon lab. Everything comes to a head on a warship with the Omega Lock. Feel like you need to catch up? The twists and turns await.

Feb
08
2014
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"Charlie's Angels" Fires Off Some Rounds For Women's Lib Review

“Once upon a time, there were three little girls who went to the police academy.” And so it was that on March 21st, 1976, Charlie’s Angels was introduced to the world. Easily written off as that “’70s glam” show with the private eyes who didn’t wear bras, its lasting influence and fan admiration attest to so much more. For many, girls particularly, this was the first show that championed empowered women who truly had it all; they were plucked from the mundane opening credits “women’s work” of past generations, with staggering good looks, and, most importantly of all, the brains to put crime in its place.

Jan
31
2014
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"You're Next" Has Never Sounded Like More Of A Threat Review

I must have missed something. After a much-buzzed premiere in Midnight Madness at the Toronto Film Festival, You’re Next was grabbed up by Lionsgate and given a wide-release. Fans heralded it as one of the smarter horror comedies made in recent years. Sorry to be the naysayer, but in an era of moviemaking that has pushed horror to the forefront of commercial viability, You’re Next is an uninspired misstep that neither amuses nor scares.

Jan
31
2014
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You'd Do Well To Hear This "Message" Review

“At one time or another, all religions were rebellions.” There are some truly memorable lines in 1977’s The Message from Arabic Muslim producer/director Moustapha Akkad, who would perhaps be best known, strangely enough, for producing all the Halloween movies. An epic three-hour saga on the founding of Islam, the picture’s instructive merit seems more needed than ever as many Westerners feign or strive to understand one of the world’s most complicated regions. To those that would seek to know more, this message is worth listening to.

Dec
16
2013
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More Than You Think Is Under "Attack" Review

Based on Yasmina Khadra’s international bestseller, The Attack is a patient, poetic glimmer of brilliance that serenely glides into the crashing tides of Middle Eastern terrorism. As small as one marriage and as sweeping as two countries relentlessly pitted against each other on the world stage, director Ziad Doueiri, originally from Beirut, Lebanon, maturely forgoes carnage for curiosity, slaughter for suspense, and rage for regret.

Dec
11
2013
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"Years Of Lightning" Remains The Ultimate Time Capsule Review

Since that fateful day in November 1963, President John Fitzgerald Kennedy has been remembered and regaled, dramatized and, every once in awhile by a real critic, demonized. What all of these biopics, dramas, and parodies share is that they are merely the works of individuals looking back and commenting years later. For the true experience of the President who inspired the world and called us to our highest angels, there is no better film to own than John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums. Produced by the United States Information Agency within two years of his death, the film captures an emotional, social, and environmental authenticity of the times that will never be replicated.

Dec
11
2013
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"Man Of Steel" Flies Superman Fearlessly Into the Future Review

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! No, it’s Rebootman! A mere seven years after the sputtering jalopy misfire that was Bryan Singer’s Superman Returns, Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen) takes the helm for the tonally divergent Man of Steel. Genre fans and geeks the world over regaled when, it seemed mere moments after the Bale Batman franchise ended with The Dark Knight Rises, it was announced that trilogy helmer Chris Nolan would shepherd the new Superman projects. Penned by Batman Begins scribe David S. Goyer, Snyder’s new tale of a Kryptonian son of Earth rising to his potential in a world afraid of him is, while undeniably entertaining, a real departure from the hero that represented America at its best.

Dec
11
2013
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Warner Brothers Releases a Blu-ray Tribute to the Staggeringly Impressive Career of Clint Eastwood Review

Few names are so singularly synonymous with Hollywood as Clint Eastwood’s. With a career spanning six decades, he has seen the rise and fall of Titans, watched cineplexes become iPhones, and stocked his mantle with five Oscars and three AFI statuettes for directing and producing in a career that began with iconic performances. As Warner Brothers releases their new 20 Film Collection, certainly Clint’s most eclectic to date, one can’t help but wonder what marvels are left up this master’s sleeve. No matter what inner reaches of the psyche he has left to examine, his body of work already rings immortal and he’ll be remembered and regaled as one of the true pillars of Hollywood, spanning the Golden Age to the new millennium. He reminds us of Tinseltown as it once was and comforts us by showing that good projects can still be made in what it is today.

Jun
14
2013
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The Final Cases and Season of "Perry Mason" Arrive on DVD Review

Long before Dick Wolf cornered the market on legal drama, before James Spader was Boston Legal, the Navy anted up in JAG, and Matlock doubled down on this very series, Perry Mason walked the boards of justice.

Expertly played by Raymond Burr, who chalked up a Best Actor Emmy and another with the amusingly outdated title Best Actor Continuous Character, Perry Mason ran for a staggering 271 episodes over nine seasons from 1957-1966. Volume 1 includes the first fifteen episodes, spanning murder suspects and fortunetellers; widowers and race drivers.

Jun
09
2013
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There's Something Offensive About the "Adventures of Bailey" Review

Lassie or Homeward Bound this is not. The third in the Adventures of Bailey series, A Night in Cowtown, will continue to make its fans happy, and bore everyone else. Meant for white Christians living in Texas, the writing is one-dimensional and cartoony dubbed voices clumsily overlaid on images of dogs don’t warrant a scratch behind the ears. The great tragedy is that Hollywood doesn’t make these movies at all anymore, leaving small production companies a window to supply subpar content for desperate families searching for an appropriate kids flick. What happened to the days of Michael J. Fox with Oscar-Winners Sally Field and the peerless Don Ameche as the hilariously heart wrenching trio Chance, Sassy, and Shadow?

Jun
07
2013
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