Plastic Yellow Band - "Breathe Air" Rocks Out In A Serious Way Review

Plastic Yellow Band has been compared to artists like Fleetwood Mac, Coldplay and John Lennon. While those are certainly apt comparisons, I have to admit that I dig lead singer Gerald Jennings’ voice a lot more than the guy from Coldplay who just broke up with Pepper Potts.

Tracks like “Lonely Place” off the album Breathe Air is beautiful, driving and melodic. The kind of track you’d see over a commercial for Ford or something. It’s a nice, slick track, perfect for hanging out around a firepit and drinking some beer. That’s the vibe I got off it.

Jul
10
2014
Read more

EdTang & The Chops - "EdTang" Takes A Turn For The Grunge Review

The self-titled EP by EdTang & The Chops isn’t dissimilar from their previous release, which had one of the most absurd names ever, Goodbye, Zen5, Sushi Dinner. That album was just fantastic, but this time around, the guys seem to have an even more folksy sound going on. If you’re into grungy-sounding folk-rock, you’re in luck.

“When Death Should Find Us” is a strong single, with lead singer EdTang’s gritty vocals driving it. I could listen to this guy every night, honestly. I can’t imagine a better voice for my generation than EdTang. He’s got soul, but more importantly, he’s got that grit that reminds me of Mike Ness without the obnoxiousness. He’s smoother than Ness, in fact. “When Death Should Find Us” has a kind-of Rembrandts meets Blues Traveler quality to it, which I like a lot.

Jun
23
2014
Read more

Keith Allan Mitchell - Keith Allan Mitchell's 'Clumsy World' is Also Very Simple Review

Keith Alan Mitchell’s voice is layered and beautiful. His album, This Clumsy World has some genuine moments of brilliance, but if you’re looking for a super-complicated and multi-instrumental affair, look elsewhere. Mitchell’s a dude with a guitar. That’s really all you need to know.

Compared to The Head The Heart as well as Tom Petty, Mitchell is in good company. While I totally get the comparisons, I found Mitchell more closely connected to Mike Edwards of Jesus Jones. I know that might be a random reference, but while listening to Mitchell, that was the first thing that popped in my head. The music is, of course, wildly different, but vocally, Mitchell and Edwards have a similar tone. It’s remarkable.

Jun
16
2014
Read more

Richard Tyler Epperson - "Hourglass" Transcends Its Easy Comparisons Review

Richard Tyler Epperson is described as a cross between John Mayer and Jason Mraz. This is strange, considering I love one of these guys and absolutely hate with every fibre of my being, the other. Thankfully, Epperson’s stylings trend more toward Mayer than Mraz. He has that simple, sing-songy quality that Mayer has, with almost the same level of intensity and haunting quality to his voice.

Epperson, as a singer-songwriter in the vein of Mayer or Elliot Smith, is brilliant. His lyrics evoke a lost youth or misspent youth quality to them, while also having a strong Unit 4+2 or even a Cat Stevens vibe to them.

Mar
15
2014
Read more

Latimer House - "All The Rage" May Be A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy Review

Who told Latimer House it was okay to sound like Rooney meets Coconut Records? How did we let this happen? Well, either way, it’s fine, because Latimer House is a pop-rock hybrid that could easily stand alongside a band like Rooney. Well, a Prague-take on power-pop or Brit-rock-esque Rooney, anyway. I love it.

“This Is Pop” is like a scathing indictment of the current state of pop-rock (“hipster”-y) music while also being the very thing it’s almost railing against. This is easily the kind of track that you’d find in a commercial for a fruit drink or for some kind of InBev “millenial”-inspired advertising campaign. I could easily see images of multi-cultural hipsters at a rooftop party drinking terrible beer while Latimer House is blaring over the soundtrack. Maybe I’m reading too much into it.

Mar
15
2014
Read more

Lakefield - You'll Swoon For These 'Swan Songs" Review

I don’t know who compared Lakefield to Death Cab For Cutie, but they’re a bunch of silly gooses. When you hear the beautiful vocals of Kate Rossiter, you can’t really think of anything, you’re just too busy swooning.

“Good Guy” is a song that I think was made to be in a Ryan Reynolds romantic comedy. It has that vibe. It’s a beautiful and sweet track, loaded with heartache and hurt and dripping with sweetness (mostly due to Rossiter’s vocals). It reminded me of “Merry Happy” by Kate Nash, if that works. It’s a harder, more aggressive song at points, but the vocals have that same dreamy quality that Nash’s tracks often have. This isn’t a bad thing, in fact, it’s quite refreshing.

Feb
08
2014
Read more

Darryl McCarty - This Album Should Make Its Way To Your iTunes At "The Speed Of Light" Review

The Speed of Light by Darryl McCarty is an awesome album. McCarty’s got one of those “everyman”-type voices that’s just beautiful and simple and really elevates the music itself. If I’m trying to describe the guy, I’d say he’s a cross between Coldplay and Kings of Leon, with a strong dash of Keane. A solid rock album, with some major alternative influences (classified as Brit Pop, no less), The Speed of Light is exactly the kind of stuff I go nuts for.

Jan
22
2014
Read more

Gumshem - The Way To "Progtronica" Is Worth The Fare Review

I’ve never been a huge fan of progressive alt-rock. I don’t know what it is, per se, but it just never really clicked with me. Going into Gumshen’s Progtronica, this was in the back of my mind, which, as a reviewer, is a crappy thing to do, to carry baggage into a review. At the same time, I try to acknowledge this as a way to move forward.

Gumshen’s latest is an interesting take on the genre. “Bell Ringer” is a great track that actually has quite a bit of funk behind it, surprisingly. The lyrics are a little silly, but lead singer Ron Hippe’s got a neat voice, reminiscent of Dave One of Chromeo, as weird as that might sound. Hippe’s certainly not a knock-off of One or anything like that, but upon first listen, that’s who Hippe reminded me of, right off the bat. I like it a lot.

Jan
22
2014
Read more

New Mongrels - "Raised Incorruptible", And Darn Near Flawless Review

Raised Incorruptible by New Mongrels is an album that’s perhaps best described as Duncan Sheik meets Simon & Garfunkel by way of James Taylor. I usually don’t go hard in the paint for indie/folk music, however; while listening to New Mongrels, I found myself really digging all 14 tracks, singling out a few here and there are favorites. I guess because I’ve been exposed to so much indie/folk-rock inspired acts via live performance lately, I was a little more accepting of what the New Mongrels are selling, however; I loved this album.

Jan
22
2014
Read more

Monks of Mellonwah - "Turn the People" Proves They've Got A Few Tricks Left Up Their Robes' Sleeves Review

I really like Monks of Mellonwah. I was passed their previous album to review and really got into it, calling the title track off Afraid To Die akin to a 007-esque Bond track. I stand by that. That last album was off the chain. Hopefully, Turn The People, their latest, is just as good.

The album starts off a little slower than the raucous excitement found in “Afraid To Die,” with “Ghost Stories” being a beautiful and evocative track, recalling Chris Cornell’s solo efforts. I was also picking up a distinct Coheed & Cambria vibe from the album as a whole, only interpreted through a more relaxed, almost Incubus-style vibe. I love all of this. This is all a win, for me.

Jan
17
2014
Read more


Popular

New Reviews